Book Lists for Literature and Composition 1 and 2

Required Books for Lit. & Comp. 1:

Voyages in English 2011 Edition Grade 8 Practice Book

(ISBN:978082948339) (Used throughout the year)

(This is the workbook for the Voyages in English curriculum and costs $13-16, depending upon where it's purchased.) The practice book will be used every week of class to reinforce the grammar and writing lessons taught in class. Please note that only the Practice Book needs to be purchased.

The Reader's Handbook for 9th-12th Grades (ISBN:0-669-49006-7) (Used throughout the year)

The Reader's Handbook is packed with information that students can use throughout their jr. high and high school years and beyond. Although we will use it almost every week to develop skills for reading various literary genres and doing research, it also contains instruction for reading textbooks and manuals, using the Internet, and taking tests, which students will find useful for other classes.

Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne (Required Summer Reading)

This classic introduces the themes of travel, time, and literary organization that will be discussed in the first part of the fall semester. Assignments for the summer reading project will be sent upon receipt of registration. Extra credit can be received for reading up to three other books upon completion of the required reading. A list of suggested books will be sent with the summer reading assignment.

The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene DuBois (Needed for the First Class in September)

We start the year with a fun and easy book which contains a number of literary devices for discussion. Students also are given independent study projects to go along with the book that allow the teacher to determine their reading, writing, and study skills for future assignments.

 

(Following The Twenty-One Balloons, students will read and analyze several short stories that will be sent to them.)

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (Needed Mid-October)

So many dramatic adaptations have been made of A Christmas Carol that most students don't know what Dickens actually wrote, why and how he wrote it, and what effects the book had on Victorian England. A simple book to read, it is surprisingly rich in literary techniques and meaning.

The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth Speare George (Christmas Break Reading)

Because the holiday break is four weeks long, students and parents like to have something to read, and this book has been a favorite with students that they often share with their families.

Animal Farm by George Orwell (Needed for the First Class in January)

A deceptive little book, Animal Farm contains hours of literary discussion material. The study of persuasion and propaganda within the book leads into employing and evaluating the methods within students' own writing.

The Story of My Life by Helen Keller (Needed in Early February)

Helen Keller's first autobiography, published when she was only twenty-one, allows students to learn about hope and overcoming the seemingly impossible. Hands-on activities give students insight into what Keller experienced. After reading the non-fiction account, the dramatic adaptation will be read.

The Miracle Worker by William Gibson (Needed Mid-March)

Inspired by The Story of My Life, this dramatic adaptation gives students the opportunity to determine the effects of adaptation on original material, as well as learn the special language and production needs of drama.

100 Best-Loved Poems Dover Thrift Edition (ISBN: 0-486-28553-7) Needed Early April)

The great variety of poetry in this small book introduces students to many types of poetry and the limitlessness of the poet's art.

Required Books for Lit. & Comp. 2:

The Reader's Handbook for 9th-12th Grades (ISBN: 0-669-49006-7) (Used throughout the year)

Further use of this book continues in Lit. & Comp. 2. (See description of the book above.)

Random House Webster's Grammar, Usage, and Punctuation (ISBN: 978-0375-72276-9) (Used throughout the year)

This easy-to-use and comprehensive handbook reinforces the grammar, writing, and research lessons taught in class as well as teaches students the value of a handbook for their future writing needs.

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin (Required Summer Reading)

The Westing Game introduces the themes of mystery and reasoning that will be explored during the fall. Assignments for the summer reading project will be sent upon receipt of registration. Extra credit can be received for reading up to three other books upon completion of the required reading. A list of suggested books will be sent with the summer reading assignment.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Needed the First Day of Class)

The elements of mystery and narrative are investigated and employed during the study of the stories read from this book. Sherlock also launches the class into the use of critical thinking skills such as deductive and inductive reasoning, identifying logical fallacies, and developing rhetoric that will be explored through the year.

 

(Following The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, the class will read and analyze several one-act plays that will be sent to them.)

100 Best Loved Poems Dover Thrift Edition (ISBN: 0-486-28553-7) (Needed for November and December)

Poems not read in Lit. & Comp. 1 will be studied during Lit. & Comp. 2 for further analysis of poetic language and styles.

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom (Christmas Break Reading)

Because the holiday break is four weeks long, students and parents like to have something to read during the break. This is another book that students enjoy reading and sharing with their families.

The Red Pony by John Steinbeck (Needed for the First Class in January)

Four short stories about a boy and his family provide advanced studies in character development and masterful narrative writing.

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells OR The Strange Case of      Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (Needed Mid-February)

Students have the choice of which book to read. In discussions led by students about each book, the class investigates two styles within the genre of science fiction written by two well-known authors with contrasting worldviews.

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (Needed Late March)

Despite its size and illustrations, The Little Prince is not a children's book, but a rich allegory about life and people, written by a man who had faced death and wanted to share what he had learned.

Materials for the Study Skills Workshop and Intensive Are Provided by the Instructor.